30th Street Burnell/McLauchlin Event

This past Saturday (January 17th, 2015) our 30th Street gallery held an event in honor of two local artists of the Hampton Roads, Virginia area, Robert Burnell and Thomas McLauchlin. It was such a pleasure getting to know both of these gentlemen and learning a little of their history.

Thomas McLauclin (left) Robert Burnell (right)

Thomas McLauclin (left) Robert Burnell (right)

Both are Portsmouth, VA natives. To learn more about Robert Burnell and see more of his work Go Here. Also to learn more about Thomas McLauclin and see more of his work Go Here. This will give you an idea as to what you will find at our 30th Street gallery in Virginia Beach if you are ever in the area and would like to stop by.

Various paintings by Robert Burnell

30th Street Burnell/McLauchlin event

There was a huge turn out for this event! So many people were impressed with the various art works and jewelry we have to offer. I love going to these events and watching peoples reactions to the various sculptures and artwork. I’ve always felt that our 30th Street gallery is the perfect place to start for any first time art collector.

Thomas McLauchlin (left) and Master Sculptor, Richard Stravitz

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The Raku Ladies

So this is a post from a different blog that we have used, and I really think it’s something that is worth be blogging about here. It’s certainly a unique medium that I’ve never heard of until about a couple of months ago. One of our very own, Nathalie Graham from the 30th Street gallery at Virginia Beach.

These are so fun looking!

These are so fun looking!

Here’s what she wrote:

“Our 30th Street Gallery has just received delightful new pieces: Martha Hayes’ “Raku Ladies”.  These original works are truly one of a kind, as the raku firing process never creates the same result twice. Martha explains how this works:

“The raku firing process began in Japan about 400 years ago. In this process the pots are taken from a red hot kiln (about 1800 degrees) and placed in a combustible material in a closed container, creating an oxygen-free atmosphere which sparks a chemical reaction called reduction. This reduction process creates metallic effects on the surface of the pots. During the reduction all of the available oxygen molecules in the atmosphere, clay and glazes are used to create combustion. Therefore the carbon left in the atmosphere seeps into the unglazed areas on the pot turning the clay black.

“The raku process is affected by many variables – changes in the atmosphere during the firing, speed of reduction and the type of combustible material used, to name a few. The effects are spontaneous and immediate and never the same”.”

So Many Projects, So Little Time!

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So, I wanted to post what’s been going on in the studio at our Laskin Road gallery in Virginia Beach. Here’s a picture I took yesterday of a commissioned piece of wrestlers called “Souplay”…. for now… that name is likely to change.

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Here is another piece that is currently in the works of two NFL football players Bruce Smith from the Bills and John Elway from the Broncos. No name as of yet so stay tuned.

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This is a picture I took early this morning with a helmet and shoulder pads on Bruce Smith. The little elves in Richards studio have really working hard to help him make things come together.

2014-12-18 10.44.31Last but certainly not least we have the lady on the bench. Eventually we plan to have two children on the bench with the lady. The concept is suppose to be of a mother that falls asleep reading a book and her children are next to her trying to tickle her nose with a flower.

This lady is actually modeled after the lovely Joy Thompson who is the daughter-in-law of Kathy Thompson. Kathy is the mother of a son who suffers from ALS, therefore making her a fervent advocate for ALS research. Learn more about her charity, Hopes and Dreams Quilt Challenge for ALS. People from all over the world donate they’re beautiful quilts to help support research for ALS.

Surreal Paintings by Micha Arkhipoff

Oil on wood  by Micha Arkhipoff

Oil on wood
by Micha Arkhipoff

This is one of the great oil paintings on wood by Micha Arkhipoff, that we have at our Laskin Road gallery in Virginia Beach. He is one of our newest artists to have work displayed. The little tag that you see below the rose says “Maison de Bonmeur” which translates to “House of Happiness”. Arkhipoff’s style is quite similar to that of Salvator Dali’s. Very three-dimensional, mystical, and definitely surreal.

On the shores of time lost Oil on wood by Micha Arkhipoff

Ok, so I have to show you one more example of his work. Just look at all of the symbolism and how detailed it all is. You can’t help but feel that the artist is trying to send some sort of message to his audience.

We do have one more painting by him at our Laskin Road gallery in Virginia Beach, VA, but you’ll have to come in to see that for yourself. I do realize that some of you may live no where close to Virginia Beach so instead you can click here to see the other painting. And feel free to browse around the rest of the site!

Vigor

Oil Painting by Denis Ribas

Oil Painting by Denis Ribas

Article written by Delores Kosciuszko

International athlete, Denis Ribas of France, creates each painting outdoors in one sitting. His vigorous brushstrokes and lively compositions cause the oil paintings to sway with rhythms that are reminiscent of Vincent Van Gogh. Forty-two countries now hail Ribas as a highly collected artist. The Stravitz gallery on Laskin Road is honored to be the debut gallery for Denis Ribas work in the USA, with an exhibition in April. Several of his pieces have arrived and are now available for eager collectors.

Refinement

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Painting by Chuck Larivey

Article By Delores Kosciuszko

Lately I have heard some people express that purchasing fine art is an extravagance, not to be entertained in difficult times. While it is true that even a masterpiece does not compare to the necessity of food or shelter, it is likewise true that some “unnecessary” things in life contribute to societal and individual well-being. I believe that collecting art fulfills this purpose quite admirably. Most works of art are purchased when a positive connection is made between the viewer and the artist’s interpretation of a particular subject. Some collectors purchase from an investment position, others simply want to enjoy the best of what life has to offer. Individual taste in art is as varied as our unique perspectives, but one thing is certain; even in difficult times, art never stops contributing to our quality of life.