Anne–Marie Savino at our Stravitz 30th Street Gallery

pen and ink dolphin

“Virginia Beach in a Dolphin” by Anne-Marie Savino. The piece won 2 awards at The Old Coast Guard Station and Museum: “Best in Show” by Director of Exhibitions, MOCA- Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art, and The People’s Choice Award.

Anne–Marie Savino is an award winning artist from Virginia Beach. She has been passionate about drawing since she was a little girl. Looking at her work you would never guess that she was self-taught. Her work captures her emotions, mood, thoughts, and her feelings as well as the wide variety of experiences she has lived.

Her preferred medium is pen and ink.

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Ms. Savino has quite a background! She is on of ten children/ Her childhood and youth were spent traveling all over the world with her family. She has lived in over 10 different countries in Sub-Saharan Africa where she experienced a wide range of cultures and languages.

We are proud to feature her work at our 30th Street Gallery in, Virginia Beach VA.

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30th Street Burnell/McLauchlin Event

This past Saturday (January 17th, 2015) our 30th Street gallery held an event in honor of two local artists of the Hampton Roads, Virginia area, Robert Burnell and Thomas McLauchlin. It was such a pleasure getting to know both of these gentlemen and learning a little of their history.

Thomas McLauclin (left) Robert Burnell (right)

Thomas McLauclin (left) Robert Burnell (right)

Both are Portsmouth, VA natives. To learn more about Robert Burnell and see more of his work Go Here. Also to learn more about Thomas McLauclin and see more of his work Go Here. This will give you an idea as to what you will find at our 30th Street gallery in Virginia Beach if you are ever in the area and would like to stop by.

Various paintings by Robert Burnell

30th Street Burnell/McLauchlin event

There was a huge turn out for this event! So many people were impressed with the various art works and jewelry we have to offer. I love going to these events and watching peoples reactions to the various sculptures and artwork. I’ve always felt that our 30th Street gallery is the perfect place to start for any first time art collector.

Thomas McLauchlin (left) and Master Sculptor, Richard Stravitz

The Raku Ladies

So this is a post from a different blog that we have used, and I really think it’s something that is worth be blogging about here. It’s certainly a unique medium that I’ve never heard of until about a couple of months ago. One of our very own, Nathalie Graham from the 30th Street gallery at Virginia Beach.

These are so fun looking!

These are so fun looking!

Here’s what she wrote:

“Our 30th Street Gallery has just received delightful new pieces: Martha Hayes’ “Raku Ladies”.  These original works are truly one of a kind, as the raku firing process never creates the same result twice. Martha explains how this works:

“The raku firing process began in Japan about 400 years ago. In this process the pots are taken from a red hot kiln (about 1800 degrees) and placed in a combustible material in a closed container, creating an oxygen-free atmosphere which sparks a chemical reaction called reduction. This reduction process creates metallic effects on the surface of the pots. During the reduction all of the available oxygen molecules in the atmosphere, clay and glazes are used to create combustion. Therefore the carbon left in the atmosphere seeps into the unglazed areas on the pot turning the clay black.

“The raku process is affected by many variables – changes in the atmosphere during the firing, speed of reduction and the type of combustible material used, to name a few. The effects are spontaneous and immediate and never the same”.”

So Many Projects, So Little Time!

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So, I wanted to post what’s been going on in the studio at our Laskin Road gallery in Virginia Beach. Here’s a picture I took yesterday of a commissioned piece of wrestlers called “Souplay”…. for now… that name is likely to change.

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Here is another piece that is currently in the works of two NFL football players Bruce Smith from the Bills and John Elway from the Broncos. No name as of yet so stay tuned.

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This is a picture I took early this morning with a helmet and shoulder pads on Bruce Smith. The little elves in Richards studio have really working hard to help him make things come together.

2014-12-18 10.44.31Last but certainly not least we have the lady on the bench. Eventually we plan to have two children on the bench with the lady. The concept is suppose to be of a mother that falls asleep reading a book and her children are next to her trying to tickle her nose with a flower.

This lady is actually modeled after the lovely Joy Thompson who is the daughter-in-law of Kathy Thompson. Kathy is the mother of a son who suffers from ALS, therefore making her a fervent advocate for ALS research. Learn more about her charity, Hopes and Dreams Quilt Challenge for ALS. People from all over the world donate they’re beautiful quilts to help support research for ALS.

Capturing Movement

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Written by Jennifer Przadka

“Jitterbug” bronze sculpture by Richard Stravitz

When someone mentions the word “Jitterbug” I think back to 1989 when the Wizard of Oz first came out on VHS. I remember watching that movie over and over in its entirety. At the very end you get to see edited scenes. One of the scenes was about a song that was recorded specifically for the movie “The Jitterbug”. I watched Dorothy, the Scarecrow, the Tin Man, and the Cowardly Lion all dance in a frenzy as if running from a literal bug. They all sing about watching out for this bug that will give you the “jitters”. The producers decided not to add it into the movie claiming that it would make the movie too long.

Come to find out “jitterbug” was a term used that described alcoholics when suffering from the “jitters”. This term became correlated with swing dancers who dance beyond any discipline or know-how of the dance. In pop-culture, it developed to mean swing dancers or a sort of swing dance.

We have a sculpture at our Laskin Road gallery that was recently created and unveiled by Richard Stravitz entitled “The Jitterbug”. If you were to come in it would be the first thing that you would see resting on a rotating potium. Which is quite appropriate considering the movement that the artist captivates in his work. It is such a lively piece and you can almost feel the excitement when you look at the expression that is permanently sculpted in both of the dancers faces. The detail doesn’t end there. Looking at the clothes gives away the era the sculpture conveys. The female is wearing the typical bobby soxer outfit, the close fitted sweater, the poodle shirt with a petticoat underneath, saddle shoes and bobby socks. The male wears rolled up slacks, penny loafers, a cool blazer with a buttoned up shirt underneath, and a neck tie. The movement of the piece is incredible with the guy pulling the girl underneath him as he jumps over her. The gentleman’s cap rests besides the sculpture as if to imply that it had flown off of his head due to the dance of a fast rhythm. It is certainly no wonder why Richard Stravitz is an award winning Master Sculptor.

 Please visit our website at http://www.sculpture-bronze.com to view the beautiful art work we have in both of our galleries!